Writing Process

What I learned from You Could Be the One

This is a long overdue post about You Could Be the One, my latest book, released a little over three weeks ago. Life and feelings happened, and if you follow #romanceclass on Twitter, you know what I mean.

But yeah, my latest book, a friends-to-lovers short story collection, is out now!

Amazon | Print (PH only)

I talked about the backstory why this book came to life in the cover reveal post, so today I’ll just talk about some important lessons I learned with this book, the one that has the shortest production time (so far).

Okay, so maybe I cheated, because It’s a Match was already out, so there wasn’t much change in that one. But every time I think it should be easier writing (because this is my favorite trope, and I know these characters), I get sucker punched and I realize that no, of course it’s not easy. I hate everything I wrote; will people even like this? Maybe I shouldn’t publish, la la la blah, blah, blah.

But we’re here, and here are three lessons I learned in writing and publishing You Could be the One:

1. Don’t over think things. Especially when you’re writing YA.

I knew this, but sometimes I forget. And let’s admit it – as writers, we often over think what we write. But because I was working on a deadline, I had to push myself to write and not think too much. Since they are short stories, anyway, I knew I didn’t have much time to explain, so I tried to keep it as simple as possible.

But God, let me tell you about Bottleneck, the second story. That was difficult. It was from my #buqoYA piece that I never got to finish, and I was just supposed to pick it back up again, with a Narnia-themed debut, a torpe guy who will allow his friends to help him by “engineering” some chemistry. It all sounded so good in my head but it kept on flopping when I wrote it. I had first person, third person, alternating POVs, but nothing really worked for me. Until the commute story came, and I was all, yay finally. Then I ran into things again and ugh, I really thought I wouldn’t be able to do this until I realized my problem: I was trying to solve their problems as an adult when they were just teens.

So the lesson is, when writing YA, it’s even more important not to over think — as an adult. Things don’t always have to make sense and yes, they are allowed to fall in love without ever really explaining why they are in love with this person. I think I was projecting my own (boring) teenage years to them, that’s why I was being all tita to them while writing. ^^;

Bottleneck Fancast + Aesthetics. Photos from Instagram/Pinterest.

Read More »What I learned from You Could Be the One

Faith Signs

I had this other, longer blog entry about jumping ship and changing POVs and stuff that I was supposed to post last Wednesday, but Thursday I decided that effort (changing POVs) wasn’t going to happen. In a way, that’s a relief because as much as it was interesting at first, Book # 2’s manuscript is already 4/5s done, and it’s wasn’t as easy to switch. And it was really just me being fickle. So I’m back to the original one, and I can’t help but get worried how it will turn out. I’ve been working on this for a looong time (too… Read More »Faith Signs